Life Sciences

  • June 18, 2024

    COVID Test Maker Can't Shake All Of $30M Faulty Kit Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge won't let California-based laboratory equipment maker Atila Biosystems Inc. out of a suit alleging it sold faulty COVID-19 testing kits, saying Fusion Diagnostic Laboratories LLC has adequately pled a breach of contract claim.

  • June 18, 2024

    J&J Fights Law Firm's Bid To Nix Subpoenas In Talc Brawl

    Information about the Beasley Allen Law Firm's litigation funding and settlement communications is relevant and necessary to resolving long-running multidistrict litigation over Johnson & Johnson's talcum powder products and so should be turned over, the pharmaceutical giant has told a New Jersey federal court.

  • June 18, 2024

    Restitution Plan For Lead-Test Defects Leaves Judge Uneasy

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday questioned the legality of a plan to have a claims administrator, rather than the court, oversee victim compensation in a criminal case alleging Magellan Diagnostics hid information about inaccurate results in its lead-testing devices.

  • June 18, 2024

    Latham Leads Boston Scientific On $1.16B Silk Road Deal

    Latham & Watkins-advised Boston Scientific Corp. said Tuesday it has agreed to acquire medical device maker Silk Road Medical Inc., represented by Wilson Sonsini, at an enterprise value of approximately $1.16 billion.

  • June 18, 2024

    Cancer Test Company DermTech Hits Ch. 11, Seeking Sale

    California-based dermatologic test maker DermTech Inc. hit Chapter 11 Tuesday in Delaware and said it would be laying off about 20% of its workforce as it seeks to sell its assets.

  • June 18, 2024

    Samsung Bioepis Denies Infringing Blood Treatment Patent

    Samsung Bioepis has fought back against a bid by Alexion to prevent it from selling a biosimilar version of a patented blood treatment drug by a rival, telling a court that this will not infringe the protections of an AstraZeneca subsidiary over the medicine.

  • June 17, 2024

    Teva, DOJ Signal Key Kickback Case May Fizzle At 1st Circ.

    A U.S. Department of Justice kickback case against Teva Pharmaceuticals — closely watched by False Claims Act lawyers because of its multibillion-dollar stakes and its link to a major circuit split — is poised for settlement, according to a new First Circuit filing ahead of eagerly awaited oral arguments.

  • June 17, 2024

    NJ Firm Defends Lien On Ex-Client's Patents After Unpaid Bills

    A major New Jersey law firm said it has a "common law" right to place a lien on its former client's patents without telling it, after the "failed" biopharmaceutical startup fired the firm and stopped paying its outstanding legal bills.

  • June 17, 2024

    USC Allegedly Used 'Junk Science' On Black Kidney Patients

    The University of Southern California secretly has been using a "junk science" scoring formula that hurts Black patients' eligibility to receive kidney transplants, according to a putative class action in California federal court.

  • June 17, 2024

    Mifepristone Ruling Means End Of Texas DACA Suit, Feds Say

    A Texas-led coalition of states doesn't have standing to challenge the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program after the U.S. Supreme Court's blockbuster decision rejecting a challenge to the abortion drug mifepristone, the Biden administration told the Fifth Circuit on Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    DOJ Wants 15 Years For Outcome CEO's $1B Fraud

    Federal prosecutors said former Outcome Health CEO Rishi Shah should serve 15 years in prison while Outcome's co-founder and ex-financial chief each serve 10 years following their convictions for running a $1 billion fraud that affected lenders, investors and clients.

  • June 17, 2024

    Top Patent Eligibility Rulings In The Decade Since Alice

    The U.S. Supreme Court's Alice v. CLS Bank decision 10 years ago this week led to scores of inventions being found ineligible for patenting, and rulings since then have fleshed out the law on the contentious topic. Here's a look at the most notable patent eligibility decisions after Alice.

  • June 17, 2024

    Ex-Stimwave CEO Gets 6 Years For Dummy Implant Scheme

    The founder and former CEO of Stimwave Technologies was sentenced to six years in prison Monday after tearfully proclaiming her innocence to healthcare fraud charges, with a Manhattan federal judge saying it's "sad" the defendant doesn't recognize the harm she inflicted by selling nonfunctional pain management device components.

  • June 17, 2024

    HUD Freed From Pa. Pot Patients' Suit Over Housing Rebuff

    Unless the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development fulfills its threat to withhold a Pennsylvania county housing agency's funding for complying with a state court order to admit licensed medical marijuana patients, a lawsuit by the county agency and two potential tenants is premature, a federal judge ruled Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    Drugmaker, PE Investor Sued In Del. Over 'Unfair' Deal Terms

    Clinical-stage biotechnology firm Omega Therapeutics' board entered into an "unfair" agreement to develop a new drug with the company's controlling private equity stockholder that was heavily tilted in favor of the majority equity holder and Omega insiders, an investor alleged in a lawsuit in Delaware's Chancery Court.

  • June 17, 2024

    Zantac Suits Must Exit State Court, Conn. Judge Told

    A Connecticut state court judge must relinquish jurisdiction over two lawsuits claiming that generic versions of the heartburn drug Zantac caused cancer because state statutes do not subject entities with foreign business registrations to the auspices of Constitution State judges, a pharmaceutical industry attorney argued at a hearing Monday morning.

  • June 17, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says Errors Led To Injunction In Trade Secrets Suit

    A Federal Circuit panel on Monday overturned a preliminary injunction against a South Korean insulin pump patch manufacturer that allegedly stole trade secrets from a rival, saying a Massachusetts federal court made a series of errors in its determination to grant an injunction.

  • June 17, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Proposed amendments to Delaware's General Corporation Law that were prompted by several recent Chancery Court rulings sailed through the state Senate last week despite loud opposition from corporate law professors and other Chancery Court watchers, and Tesla shareholders filed two new suits against CEO Elon Musk. 

  • June 17, 2024

    Talc Claimants Want Documents In Fight Over J&J Unit Venue

    Cancer patients with talc damage claims against Johnson & Johnson have urged a New Jersey federal court to give them access to transcripts and exhibits from depositions of top executives at the company's talc unit, saying the information will aid their effort to bar the J&J spinoff from filing a third Chapter 11 outside the Garden State.

  • June 14, 2024

    Justices Are Asked To Wade Into Blood Pressure Drug IP Fight

    United Therapeutics is taking its patent case seeking to stop a rival from selling a drug that competes with its blockbuster treatment for high blood pressure to the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • June 14, 2024

    Janssen Hit With $150M Verdict In HIV Drug False Claims Suit

    A New Jersey federal jury hit Janssen with a $150 million False Claims Act verdict in a 12-year-old whistleblower suit, finding that the drugmaker violated the federal law as well as 27 related state FCA statutes by illegally profiting from the off-label marketing of two popular Janssen HIV medications.

  • June 14, 2024

    3rd Circ. Merges 3 Challenges To Medicare Drug Price Talks

    The Third Circuit will hear three separate appeals challenging Medicare's drug price negotiations together, according to a new order consolidating cases brought by AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Janssen Pharmaceuticals in New Jersey and Delaware federal courts.

  • June 14, 2024

    Judge Won't Undo Save Of J&J Patent After Fed. Circ. Ruling

    A federal court has refused to reconsider a March decision finding Tolmar failed to show a patent on Janssen's blockbuster schizophrenia drug Invega Sustenna was invalid as obvious.

  • June 14, 2024

    Pfizer Worker's Ex-Wife Can't Raid 401(k) To Collect Damages

    The ex-wife of a former Pfizer employee can't use her ex-husband's 401(k) account to collect damages awarded in a defamation suit against him, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, saying federal benefits law prevents her from seizing his retirement contributions.

  • June 14, 2024

    Australian Biotech Firm Telix Pharmaceuticals Pulls US IPO

    Australian biotechnology firm Telix Pharmaceuticals Ltd., whose U.S. shares were set to debut trading on Friday, canceled plans for an estimated $202 million U.S. initial public offering, citing unfavorable market conditions.

Expert Analysis

  • High Court's Abortion Pill Ruling Shuts Out Future Challenges

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling in U.S. Food and Drug Administration v. Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine maintains the status quo for mifepristone access and rejects the plaintiffs' standing theories so thoroughly that future challenges from states or other plaintiffs are unlikely to be viable, say Jaime Santos and Annaka Nava at Goodwin.

  • Emerging Trends In ESG-Focused Securities Litigation

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    Based on a combination of shareholder pressure, increasing regulatory scrutiny and proposed rulemaking, there has been a proliferation of litigation over public company disclosures and actions regarding environmental, social, and governance factors — and the overall volume of such class actions will likely increase in the coming years, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Orange Book Warnings Highlight FTC's Drug Price Focus

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    In light of heightened regulatory scrutiny surrounding drug pricing and the Federal Trade Commission's activity in the recent Teva v. Amneal case, branded drug manufacturers should expect the FTC's campaign against allegedly improper Orange Book listings to continue, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • A Plaintiffs-Side Approach To Cochlear Implant Cases

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    As the number of cochlear implants in the U.S. continues to grow, some will inevitably fail — especially considering that many recalled implants remain in use — plaintiffs attorneys should proactively prepare for litigation over defective implants, says David Shoop at Shoop.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Tracking China's Push To Invalidate Foreign Patents

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    China’s increasing use of courts and administrative panels to nullify patents in strategically important industries, such as technology, pharmaceuticals and rare-earth minerals, raises serious concerns about the intellectual property rights of foreign businesses operating there, say Rajat Rana and Manuel Valderrama at Selendy Gay.

  • Takeaways From Nat'l Security Division's Historic Declination

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    The Justice Department National Security Division's recent decision not to prosecute a biochemical company for an employee's export control violation marks its first declination under a new corporate enforcement policy, sending a clear message to companies that self-disclosure of misconduct may confer material benefits, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Updated Federal Rules Can Improve Product Liability MDLs

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    The recent amendment of a federal evidence rule regarding expert testimony and the proposal of a civil rule on managing early discovery in multidistrict legislation hold great promise for promoting the uniform and efficient processes that high-stakes product liability cases particularly need, say Alan Klein and William Heaston at Duane Morris.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • How Cannabis Rescheduling May Alter Paraphernalia Imports

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to loosen federal restrictions on marijuana use raises questions about how U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforcement policies may shift when it comes to enforcing a separate federal ban on marijuana accessory imports, says R. Kevin Williams at Clark Hill.

  • What The NYSE Proposed Delisting Rule Could Mean For Cos.

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    The New York Stock Exchange's recently proposed rule would provide the exchange with discretionary authority to commence delisting proceedings for a company substantially shifting its primary business focus, raising concerns for NYSE-listed companies over the exact definition of the exchange's proposed "substantially different" standard, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • FDA Warning Indicates Scrutiny Of Regenerative Health Cos.

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's recent warning letter to Akan Biosciences is a quintessential example of the agency's enforcement priorities for certain products involving human cells and tissues, and highlights ongoing scrutiny placed on manufacturers, say Dominick DiSabatino and Cortney Inman at Sheppard Mullin.

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