White Collar

  • June 18, 2024

    Ayahuasca Church Says DOJ Should Pay $2.2M Legal Fees

    A Phoenix-based church that secured a deal with the U.S. Department of Justice allowing it to legally use ayahuasca for its religious practices is now asking an Arizona federal court to make the government pay $2.2 million, covering the costs of litigating the case and giving its attorneys an "appropriate" bonus.

  • June 18, 2024

    11th Circ. Affirms Warrantless Search Of Probationer's Home

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday affirmed the denial of a woman's bid to suppress evidence obtained by police in a warrantless search of her home, finding that the search was reasonable because her live-in boyfriend's probation conditions authorized warrantless home searches.

  • June 18, 2024

    CFTC Awards $8M To Whistleblower Behind Multiple Actions

    The Commodity Futures Trading Commission has announced it awarded more than $8 million to an insider whistleblower who the agency said provided significant information that led to multiple enforcement actions from multiple agencies.

  • June 18, 2024

    Legalization Foe SAM Seeks Hearing On Pot Rescheduling

    A leading anti-marijuana-legalization advocacy organization on Tuesday formally submitted its request to the Drug Enforcement Administration to hold administrative hearings on the Attorney General's proposal to reschedule cannabis.

  • June 18, 2024

    Gov't Says New Guidelines Can't Cut Crypto Expert's Sentence

    Federal prosecutors have told a Manhattan federal judge that the crypto computing expert who received five years for aiding North Korea's blockchain development shouldn't get to cut a year off his sentence just because sentencing guidelines have been updated while he's served his term.

  • June 18, 2024

    Sterling Bank Ex-CEO Won't Face Charges Over Loan Program

    The founder and former CEO of Sterling Bank and Trust, who has been investigated in connection with a fraud-plagued loan program, will not face criminal charges from the U.S. Department of Justice, according to Michigan federal court documents filed Monday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Archegos Trader Doubles Down On Hwang Accusations

    A former protégé of Archegos founder Bill Hwang told New York federal jurors Tuesday that the hedge fund boss directed manipulative and improper trading, pushing back on insinuations by Hwang's counsel that the trades were above-board.

  • June 18, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Names Ex-Arkansas AG As State AG Co-Lead

    Philadelphia-based Cozen O'Connor announced on Tuesday the hiring of a former Arkansas attorney general to help lead the firm's state attorneys general group from its office in Little Rock.

  • June 18, 2024

    FTC Escalates Probe Into TikTok's Privacy Measures For Kids

    The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday took the rare step of publicly disclosing its referral to the U.S. Department of Justice of a complaint against TikTok and its parent company over their compliance with a 2019 privacy settlement, saying there's "reason to believe" that the companies are out of step with their pledge to protect children on the platform.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ga. Judge Won't Recuse Over Closed-Door Chat In YSL Case

    A Georgia state judge on Tuesday denied a motion to disqualify himself from continuing to preside over Atlanta rapper Young Thug's racketeering trial, calling the bid "insufficient" and rejecting the rapper's claim that the judge had "joined the prosecutors' team" by unethically having a closed-door conversation with prosecutors and a witness.

  • June 18, 2024

    Korean Airline Can't Get $50M Catering Award Nixed

    A California judge enforced a $50 million arbitral award issued to a catering company following a dispute with South Korea's Asiana Airlines, rejecting an argument that the award couldn't be enforced because the underlying contract was tainted by corruption.

  • June 18, 2024

    Social Media Stock Promoter Beats Trader's Suit For Good

    A Texas federal judge has tossed a suit from a stock trader alleging a social media stock promoter artificially drove up share prices, saying the promoter did not have any duty to disclose to the trader his plans to sell the shares.

  • June 18, 2024

    DC Bar Counsel Moves To Suspend Hunter Biden's Law License

    Attorney disciplinary authorities in the nation's capital have moved to suspend Hunter Biden's license to practice law there after he was convicted of three federal gun charges last week.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ga. County Solicitor General Charged With Stealing Public Cash

    A Georgia state grand jury on Tuesday issued a 24-count indictment against Hall County Solicitor General Stephanie Woodard that accuses her of using taxpayer dollars for her personal benefit for four years.

  • June 18, 2024

    2nd Circ. Says No Gov't Misconduct In Campaign Money Case

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday reversed a ruling from a Connecticut federal judge that found prosecutors violated their evidence disclosure obligations in a campaign finance case against a former state senator and his treasurer.

  • June 18, 2024

    McElroy Deutsch Says Exec Embezzled Money For Home

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP has doubled down on its bid for a constructive trust on the home of two former executives accused of stealing from the firm.

  • June 18, 2024

    Restitution Plan For Lead-Test Defects Leaves Judge Uneasy

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday questioned the legality of a plan to have a claims administrator, rather than the court, oversee victim compensation in a criminal case alleging Magellan Diagnostics hid information about inaccurate results in its lead-testing devices.

  • June 18, 2024

    Mich. AG To Pursue Deadlocked Charges In Carhartt Atty Case

    Prosecutors will continue pursuing embezzlement charges against a Michigan attorney accused of stealing from his client, a former leader of the Carhartt workwear company, after a Wayne County jury couldn't reach a decision on those claims but acquitted the attorney on other charges.

  • June 18, 2024

    Foley Hoag Hires Former DOJ Fraud Section Deputy

    Foley Hoag LLP has hired a former deputy chief of the U.S. Department of Justice's Fraud Section, who will work with the firm's white collar crime and government investigations practice in Washington, D.C.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ex-USC Linebacker Cops To Pandemic Unemployment Fraud

    A former linebacker for the University of Southern California football team pled guilty to fraudulently seeking over $1 million in pandemic-era unemployment benefits.

  • June 18, 2024

    NY High Court Denies Trump's Gag Order Appeal

    New York state's highest court on Tuesday denied Donald Trump's rapid appeal of the gag order that limited his speech during his criminal hush money trial, finding it did not raise serious constitutional issues.

  • June 17, 2024

    Teva, DOJ Signal Key Kickback Case May Fizzle At 1st Circ.

    A U.S. Department of Justice kickback case against Teva Pharmaceuticals — closely watched by False Claims Act lawyers because of its multibillion-dollar stakes and its link to a major circuit split — is poised for settlement, according to a new First Circuit filing ahead of eagerly awaited oral arguments.

  • June 17, 2024

    CFPB Reaches $7M Deal In Suit Over Ex-Exec's Money Moves

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Monday that it will accept $7 million from a former online loan executive and his wife to resolve a Kansas federal court lawsuit in which the agency accuses them of trying to keep millions more dollars out of the agency's reach.

  • June 17, 2024

    Pastor Tied To NYC Mayor Gets 9 Years For Fraud Conviction

    A clergyman and self-described mentee of New York City Mayor Eric Adams on Monday was sentenced to nine years in federal prison following his conviction at trial for a series of fraudulent real estate and business loans, among other misdeeds.

  • June 17, 2024

    Man In Murder-For-Hire Plot To Kill Atty Gets Extradited To NY

    An Indian national indicted in connection with a murder-for-hire plot to assassinate an attorney connected to a Punjab political revolution has been extradited to the Southern District of New York and made his initial appearance in federal court Monday, during which he pled not guilty to the criminal charges against him.

Expert Analysis

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

    Author Photo

    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

    Author Photo

    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Takeaways From Nat'l Security Division's Historic Declination

    Author Photo

    The Justice Department National Security Division's recent decision not to prosecute a biochemical company for an employee's export control violation marks its first declination under a new corporate enforcement policy, sending a clear message to companies that self-disclosure of misconduct may confer material benefits, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Deciphering SEC Disgorgement 4 Years After Liu

    Author Photo

    Since the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2020 decision in Liu v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to preserve SEC disgorgement with limits, courts have continued to rule largely in the agency’s favor, but a recent circuit split over the National Defense Authorization Act's import may create hurdles for the SEC, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Wiretap Use In Cartel Probes Likely To Remain An Exception

    Author Photo

    Although the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division has recently signaled interest in wiretaps, the use of this technology to capture evidence of antitrust conspiracies and pursue monopolization as a criminal matter has been rare historically, and is likely to remain so, say Carsten Reichel and Will Conway at DLA Piper.

  • The OIG Report: DOD Review May Cause Contractor Dilemmas

    Author Photo

    Given a recent Office of Inspector General report finding that the U.S. Department of Defense awarded billions of dollars in contracts without performing the requisite financial responsibility reviews, contractors should prepare for a lengthier, more burdensome process and the possibility of re-review, says Diana Shaw at Wiley.

  • Playing The Odds: Criminal Charges Related To Sports Betting

    Author Photo

    In light of recent sports betting scandals involving MLB player Shohei Ohtani and NBA player Jontay Porter, institutions and individuals involved in athletics should be aware of and prepared to address the legal issues, including potential criminal charges, that sports gambling may bring to their door, say attorneys at Steptoe.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

    Author Photo

    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

    Author Photo

    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Cannabis Rescheduling May Alter Paraphernalia Imports

    Author Photo

    The Biden administration's recent proposal to loosen federal restrictions on marijuana use raises questions about how U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforcement policies may shift when it comes to enforcing a separate federal ban on marijuana accessory imports, says R. Kevin Williams at Clark Hill.

  • Opinion

    New Guidance On Guilty Plea Withdrawals Is Long Past Due

    Author Photo

    In light of the Sentencing Reform Act's 40th anniversary, adding a new section to the accompanying guidelines on the withdrawal of guilty pleas could remedy the lack of direction in this area and improve the regulation's effectiveness in promoting sentencing uniformity, say Mark H. Allenbaugh at SentencingStats.com and Alan Ellis at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Boeing Saga Underscores Need For Ethical Corporate Culture

    Author Photo

    In the wake of recent allegations about Boeing’s safety culture, and amid the U.S. Department of Justice’s new whistleblower incentives, business leaders should reinvigorate their emphasis on compliance by making clear that long-term profitability requires ethical business practices, says Maxwell Carr-Howard at Dentons.

  • Key Takeaways From 2024 Accountants' Liability Conference

    Author Photo

    At the recent annual Accountants' Liability Conference, regulators provided important commentary on new Public Company Accounting Oversight Board rulemaking and standard-setting initiatives, and emphasized regulatory priorities ranging from the tone at the top to alternative practice structures, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!